Figs are fun!

Granted I have a strange sense of fun.  But anything is better than making enough sauce for the entire year in just three days.

Sy came across an insanely good fig spread a couple of years back when he got a sample at a previous, food related job.  It goes great with cheese and crackers, pork roast or even just a spoonful straight out the jar.

8 lbs of figs after being washed and their stems cut off.
8 lbs of figs after being washed and their stems cut off.

It’s expensive though.  We can get it around here for about $7 a jar but that’s a bit too rich for my blood for 8.5 oz even if it is addictive.

So of course I decided to make it myself.  This recipe is easy, shelf stable and can be made in any amount you want, just keep in mind the 1 to 1 fig to sugar ratio.  A kitchen scale is essential but that’s the only specialized kitchen equipment one needs beyond the canning supplies.

After being prepped the figs need to sit in sugar to macerate for at least three hours.
After being prepped the figs need to sit in the sugar to macerate for at least three hours.

Technically you can grow figs in my zone but I have neither the time, space nor inclination to do so.  This is what farmers and wholesalers are for.

Last year my youngest sister was working at the food terminal doing the books for a cash and carry wholesaler so she gave me a call when the figs came in.  The people are wonderful and anyone can walk in for a 50 lb provolone, 10 lbs of mortadella or a case of broccoli.  Oh the possibilities!

This is the worst part, stirring the figs and sugar till the figs release some of their juice and the sugar melts.
This is the worst part, stirring the figs and sugar till the figs release some of their juice and the sugar melts.

For just over $25 in supplies and a few hours of my time I ended up with 13 pints that had only two ingredients (the commercial stuff understandably has citric acid and a couple of preservatives) and it kept us in fig spread for a year.

The price in 2014 terms was .82¢ an ounce for the commercial stuff and .25¢ for the homemade.

Melted and ready to cook for 40 minutes or so.
Melted and ready to cook for 40 minutes or so. Hit with an immersion blender at the end and it’s the perfect consistency!

Yeah, that’s just a no-brainer.

This year I doubled the amount.

Ready for canning!
Ready for canning!

Let there be fig spread!

 

 

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